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Training / Re: First Time Ascent
« Last post by Mark on June 22, 2018, 06:46:49 pm »
Another good gauge and race day prep practice would be to do the Barr Trail Mountain Race, it's about a month before the Ascent/Marathon. It's up and down to Barr Camp from/to the Cog station in Manitou. It will also give you an idea of the bottom half aid station help you'll get on course during the Ascent. 
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Training / Re: First Time Ascent
« Last post by Mark on June 21, 2018, 07:45:48 pm »
First off, you'll want to be in great aerobic shape! If you live close to Barr trail, try to train on it every weekend! If you can't do that hit the big hills where you live and/or get on a treadmill and set it to 15% and go, go, go until you can't stand it any more...
I think John V posted about an Ascent treadmill simulation on this site recently. Check that out too.
Good Luck! might see you on race day if my sprained ankle lets me:( 
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Training / First Time Ascent
« Last post by wcresswell on June 20, 2018, 10:07:50 pm »
Hi. I'm running the ascent this year for the first time.  I'm a pretty bad runner but I like to get out and climb stuff sometimes.  Anyway I don't have a time goal and I'm not too worried about simply making the 6:30 cutoff, but I am wondering how I can train for that much uphill.  The pitch of it seems incredible too since even other uphill races I look at don't seem to gain nearly the same rate of feet/mile.
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I have a Nordic Track Incline Trainer.  I have an ifit subscription and along with Google Maps that lets me run routes on the treadmill that follow a preplanned route with map or satellite views on the touchscreen display.  If the Google car has been along the route, I can also get the street views.

A summer or two ago hikers carried the Google cameras and recording equipment up the Barr Trail and the Incline and even the PPA segment through the first aide station until in joins the Barr Trail.  I can now run the PPA on my Incline Trainer from the start line to the finish line.  The incline adjusts automatically as the elevation changes.  The limits are -6% decline to 40% incline.  All I have to do is adjust the speed as the incline increases or decreases.  The display looks exactly like you are running on the course.  It is not a full video but sequential photos looking forward as you run.
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Training / Re: Flatlander Training Feedback
« Last post by peak on March 29, 2018, 08:33:19 am »
I think if you can run a 1:48 half you will be fine. With that fitness level you should be closer to a 4:00 to 4:15 ascent. The biggest question will be what effect the altitude has on you. You will want to make sure that you don't out to fast at the start. That can cause a lot of issues later in the race. Also, you will most likely be "walking" 80-90% of the race.

Yeah, not underestimating the altitude is the biggest thing, i think. You could also think about using a supplement like that, in addition. It can help with balancing the energy level. However, you should definitely talk to a doctor, before doing so. This is highly recommended.
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Training / Re: Flatlander Training Feedback
« Last post by Mark on March 18, 2018, 01:00:08 pm »
I think if you can run a 1:48 half you will be fine. With that fitness level you should be closer to a 4:00 to 4:15 ascent. The biggest question will be what effect the altitude has on you. You will want to make sure that you don't out to fast at the start. That can cause a lot of issues later in the race. Also, you will most likely be "walking" 80-90% of the race.
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Training / Flatlander Training Feedback
« Last post by ericsonb5 on March 15, 2018, 07:34:08 pm »
Hi Everyone,

I was hoping to get some feedback to see if I am on track to complete Pikes Peak Ascent in August.  To be clear, my goal is simply to complete the ascent before the 6:30 cutoff.  I have no time goal.  A bit of background - I completed the half marathon qualifier in 1:48 (8:18 pace) in February in Minchigan.  Since that time, I have adopted the following training regimen:

-2 days per week of 45-minutes @ 15% incline, alternating between 4.0 mph (light run) and 3.0 mph (walk)
-1 days per week of 90 minutes of the Pikes simulation

I just had a baby and training time is a bit sparse.  I plan to increase the two days to 60 minutes as I approach the race.  I also plan to up the simulation until I am completing the entire simulation each week.  I also have begun taking high altitude training pills.

So, my question is whether this plan seems like it is enough for me to complete the ascent in the allotted time frame.

Thanks.
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Thanks for the 2018 registration Pikes Peak Veteran Discount 15-19 year discount.
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Training / Re: Am I Out?
« Last post by dnavarro927 on January 22, 2018, 09:30:38 am »
Those are good ways to gauge this, thanks!

In races that I have done, especially in recent years, I am typically within the top 10-15% in my age-group.

My half marathon qualifier was a 1:52 and was part of a half ironman.  Doing a standalone half marathon, I'm confident I'd be able to run a 1:30 to 1:40 with running three days a week (mixing in other activities on the other days).
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Training / Re: Am I Out?
« Last post by John Garner on January 19, 2018, 03:39:24 pm »
It totally depends on where you were to start and what your goals are.

If you are one of the top 10% of genetically gifted folks who don't have to do much in terms of training to run a sub 1:30 half marathon and just want to finish, you could probably do next to no training, walk up the hill backwards, and still make it under the cutoff time with an hour or two to spare. (We all hate folks like this.)

If you are a mid-packer and your parents didn't bestow you with the right genetics, you may be able to get away with less than you think. If you can get in 8+ weeks of solid hill training then you would have a good chance of finishing under the cutoff. Doing your "best" will take 6-8 months of very carefully planned training and may need to wait until 2019.

If you are a back of the packer for whom the qualifications were daunting enough, you are going to want 4-6+ months of solid hill training 4-5x per week just to have a chance of finishing.

As for doing other things, try cycling. While not optimal, you would be improving the same part of the body that carries you up the trail.

--john
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