Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Race Info / Re: Shoes? or snow shoes?
« Last post by jemahon on May 23, 2017, 08:44:05 pm »
My non-expert opinion is if you did not have any issues with your shoes last year then why take a risk?

I have narrow feet so my choice of shoes is limited.  I have trained on the Peak in New Balance 99x's for going on 2 decades and I use slightly lighter but still stable Nikes in the race.

However, if the race were this weekend, we would all need snowshoes.

http://www.cograilway.com/webcam.asp#pikes-peak-cam

Jim Mahon
2
Race Info / Re: Shoes?
« Last post by John Garner on May 23, 2017, 08:37:07 pm »
Road shoes work just fine. I've used them more often than trail shoes. Pikes peak grannet is rather sharp, and there is very little mud along Barr Trail.

The main thing is that they are comfortable. The 2nd biggest thing is that they are light.

If you are running the marathon, something with a bit more cushion is recomended.

My current pick is the hoka clifton 3.
3
Race Info / Shoes?
« Last post by brad7891 on May 23, 2017, 09:43:41 am »
Any suggestions on shoes? I used my regular road shoes last year, and have continued to train in them - is it worth the switch?
4
Training / Re: anyone know where to park to run from say 10K to 14K on road
« Last post by Mitch Walma on May 14, 2017, 05:10:53 pm »
The only place you could park at close to that elevation would be the crags trail on the west side of the peak.  It does not share any of the route of the Ascent/Marathon.  You can drive to the trailhead, but all the running is on a trail, not the road.  It's a bit over 12 miles up and back, 4500' elevation gain.

14.4 miles 4800 is what I get on my training runs up the Crags side. Steep in the beginning, 2-3 miles of gentle running at high altitude from Devil's Playground to the class 2 final climb. It's closed for hazard tree removal until early June. Probably plenty of snow still now.
5
Training / Re: anyone know where to park to run from say 10K to 14K on road
« Last post by Mark C on May 07, 2017, 06:41:44 am »
The only place you could park at close to that elevation would be the crags trail on the west side of the peak.  It does not share any of the route of the Ascent/Marathon.  You can drive to the trailhead, but all the running is on a trail, not the road.  It's a bit over 12 miles up and back, 4500' elevation gain.
6
Training / Re: Training Feedback for a flatlander
« Last post by bill robinette on April 28, 2017, 05:49:22 am »
Thanks for all the feedback.  I think I am going to stick to my marathon training schedule with these two exceptions.

1.  I am going to replace my longer midweek run (1/2 of my long run for the week) to do the treadmill at a constant rate (12-15%) for the equivalent amount of time.

2.  I am going to replace my long run on the weekend with the treadmill simulation making sure that I am adding some distance each week until I begin my 3 week taper.

I hope to get out to Manitou Springs the second week of June.  By the time I get there on the first day I will probably only have enough time to trek up to Barr Camp or so.  The next day I am going to do some trails at the Garden of the Gods.  The last day I hope I can make it all the way up the mountain so I can see how bad it is going to be above the tree line.

Thanks for everyone's input.  Looking forward (with some trepidation) to August.  I am sure this will be the toughest test yet! I feel like I will be physically prepared, not sure if I will be mentally prepared for the altitude.

7
Training / Re: Training Feedback for a flatlander
« Last post by brad7891 on April 27, 2017, 02:29:24 pm »
Hi Bill -

Like some of the others, I am a flatlander (Michigan), and last year was my first race.

I reserved several hours on Sundays for Netflix and treadmill work. Generally, I would follow the grade simulation charts that are available on the Forum as it bakes in some nice breaks. Outside of Sunday's I followed a general marathon plan, and especailly focused on overall diet within the last 6 weeks.

I definitely agree with trying to get out and hike above A-frame if able. It was a complete shock to me how quickly I went from relatively comfortable to miserable.

Finally, expect to walk most of it. As the trail narrows, there will be a long line of zombies ahead of you that make it difficult/not worth the energy to pass.
8
Training / Re: Garden of the Gods
« Last post by bill robinette on April 26, 2017, 05:46:36 am »
Thanks.  Very helpful
9
Training / Re: Garden of the Gods
« Last post by Mark on April 25, 2017, 08:28:43 pm »
Do Barr Trail if you can only do one.

Tips:

1) Get going early, like 7:00am! You want to be done very early in the afternoon, you don't want to be caught in a thunderstorm above A-Frame...
2) Pack plenty of water/snacks/gloves/hat/jacket. There is water available out of No Name Creek and the stream at Barr Camp but you'll probably want to filter it. (I take may own water on training runs so it makes race day even that more special by not having to lug all that extra weight up)
3) Plan your way down.
   - You can get tix for a ride down on the Cog but if you miss your scheduled time you're SOL, see next points...
   - Hitch hike, usually not too hard to get a ride back down to Manitou from the Peak.
   - Have somebody pick you up at the top.
   - Walk/run down the trail (points 1 and 2 above apply), but your quads and flexors will probably feel like crap for the following week or two.

There is also a pretty good possibility of significant snow on the trail above A-Frame mid June, be prepared.

Here is a link to a camera at the top, check out the piles of snow either side...
http://www.cograilway.com/Summit/summitcam.jpg
Snowed today and will probably snow up there everyday this week!!!

2 years ago there was ~6 feet of snow on a small section of the trail near the top 2 weeks from race day. Thankfully, volunteers ice picked and shoveled it away.   
 
Good Luck!
10
Training / Re: Training Feedback for a flatlander
« Last post by murmur173 on April 25, 2017, 03:55:21 pm »
My 2 cents as a fellow flatlander --

Last year was my first PPA, and I finished in 4:26. My training was focused on long, hilly routes in Austin. Looking back, all of that time should've been spent on the treadmill. The whole thing was hard, but I don't think I was mentally prepared for the final 3 miles. It's really difficult being able to see and hear the finish line, but knowing you've got at least an hour to go!

With all the wisdom and experience that comes from 1 PPA, I've completely revamped my training for this year's race:

Monday: Easy jog outside or cross (swim/bike)
Tuesday: Easy jog outside
Wednesday: 1-2 mile warmup, 20 min @6-8% (increasing later to 10-12% in the training and working in some speedwork), 1-2 mile cooldown on the treadmill
Thursday: Cross or rest
Friday: Easy jog outside
Saturday: long run @10-12% (times start at 60 mins and increase to 210 mins) on the treadmill
Sunday: Rest or cross

Have fun with your training and good luck in August!
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10